first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Ten of the nation’s largest banks are set to return more than 34 percent of the TARP bail-out loans including  $1.8 billion in interest. The financial institutions, J.P. Morgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Capital One, American Express and Morgan-Stanley among them, will pay back $68 billion of the $199 billion in taxpayer money, beginning as early as next week. The decision is a milestone for the Obama administration’s financial rescue plan, reflecting new confidence that some large banks have returned to stable profitability. (Read More in the Washington Post) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIn 1995, 62 year old Wilma Melville and her black lab Murphy were deployed to the Oklahoma City bombing for search and rescue work.Devastated by the experience, Melville saw a national need to better train and increase the number of professional canine rescue teams.She founded the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation, a non-profit that partners shelter dogs with firefighters. The 131 FEMA certified teams trained for free, have deployed to 80 missions worldwide, including the World Trade Center on September 11th, the earthquake in Haiti, the tsunami in Japan and the tornado in Joplin.(WATCH the video below, or read the story at CNN Heroes)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreMore than 100 musicians, painters and performers took part this year in the second annual “O+” Festival in Kingston, New York.Named for the blood type, the festival allows artists to barter their works and performances for health care in the form of back adjustments, blood work, dental fillings and eye exams.Kingston dentist Thomas Cingel initially came up with the idea as a way to lure artists upstate. Dr. Cingel settled in the Hudson Valley for its natural beauty, yet missed the big city’s music scene. In May 2010 he emailed a Brooklyn indie band, promising them dental services in exchange for playing a Kingston show.From there, the idea has grown.(WATCH the video below from Channel 13, or READ the story from the Wall Street Journal)Thanks to XKim for sending the link!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreFamily at the beach in the Maldives, by Marzena SyncerzIn the U.S., Canada, and Europe, summer is still in full swing, but we all know the end is near.We wanted to share these classic photos of summer fun to show how it’s done because it’s not too late to plan a picnic, visit a lake, or set up a sprinkler in the back yard.Try visiting a farmers market to buy fresh fruit — giving yourself the taste of summer.Sprinkler karate, by Lotus CarrollStrawberry Picking with my sister, by basheertomeBlowing bubbles in Berlin, by Niels LinnebergDog Days of Summer, by Rob BMy son is too cool for summer, by Christine WainscottAll photos shareable via CC license or direct submission to GNN. Submit your photo here and we’ll add it to the page!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreAt the end of last night’s Gentlemen’s Ball in New York City, emcee Andy Cohen said he felt like his life “is a waste.” After sitting in a room full of celebrity humanitarians, who can blame him?For the seventh year, the GQ Gentlemen’s Ball saluted ten men, five movie stars and five non-celebs, whose commitment to their communities defines what it means to be a gentleman today.(L-R) Andrew Garfield, Joshua Jackson, and Taylor Kitsch honored last night in New York City.In recognition of their efforts, Ambassador Awards were awarded to Andrew Garfield, for his support of Worldwide Orphans and Youth Mentoring Connection, Joshua Jackson, for his support of Oceana, Taylor Kitsch, for his support of the African Children’s Choir, George Lopez, for his involvement with the Lopez Foundation, and Zachary Quinto, for his support of The Trevor Project.Awards were also given to the five non-celebrities who are working to help people in Congo and the US, and women across Africa, Sean Carasso, F.K. Day, Nick Ehrmann, Stephen Powell and Barrett Ward.(READ the full story in the GQ)Photo credits: (top) Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for GQ (bottom) Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for GQAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Diehard Seattle Seahawks fan Sherri Forch has never seen her National Football League heroes play in person. That will change Saturday, when she will not only attend the Seahawks’ divisional playoff game in a wheelchair, but be right on the 50-yard line under shelter, thanks to generous fans and family.Her friend Karen Pickett, who organized a fundraiser for the ailing Forch, said the response from fans was “overwhelming.” Strangers have offered numerous tickets, a limo ride and money for the food and drinks.“I am in orbit, over the moon, just blessing the universe from one end to the other,” Forch said Saturday night.(WATCH the video above, or READ the full story in the Tacoma News-Tribune)Story tip from Judy RitchieAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreTalk about a bright idea.When a 20-year-old college student went to visit her grandparents in India back in 2010, she noticed that many people were living without light—that, or they were using bulbs that fairly quickly ran out. She immediately decided to buy energy efficient bulbs for ten families using her own money.Mansi Prakash, now an economics major at New York University, came up with a solution that was simple but effective, one that would go on to change the lives of thousands: sending eco-friendly light bulbs to small villages.“Most families have light bulbs—they just weren’t turning them on and using them,” Prakash told TakePart.  “For someone who couldn’t afford food three times a day, paying the high electricity bills was not an option.”This Lamp Light Burns All Night Powered Only by a Glass of SaltwaterIf they used an 11-watt compact fluorescent bulb instead, which costs about $2 and lasts 3-4 years, residents would save 80% on their energy bills. The money saved could go toward health care, food or education.Being able to turn on lights whenever you need them can give families more hours in the day to be productive, and allow children more time to study.Prakash, who was born in India and raised in the Philippines, has since founded the nonprofit Brighter Today and–with help from the Clinton Foundation–has been distributing energy-efficient bulbs that are donated by electronics giant Philips.To date, her nonprofit has helped bring cheaper electricity to 5,300 homes in rural India.Teenage Girl Turns Plastic Trash Into Million-Dollar BiofuelPrakash is also focused on a new solar project called Light for Life that she hopes will illuminate homes that have no access to electricity. It is another innovative device that brings in daylight with a plastic bottle, bleach and water.(READ more at TakePart) Photos: Brighter Today, FacebookIlluminate Your Friends… (Share Below)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore8-year-old Atticus Edwards may not be able to do any grinds, but he’s surely shredding it at the skate park.Born with cerebral palsy in Sacramento, California, Atticus’ mother describes wheelchair skateboarding as her son’s chosen form of therapy. Due to his condition, Atticus doesn’t talk much – but if you watch the video above, he can’t help but let out a yell of excitement after his dad rolls him through the turns.NEED A DAILY DOSE OF SMILES? …GET OUR GOOD NEWS APP—>  Download FREE for Android and iOS“That was fantastic!” Atticus shouts with a smile.Not only is the self-prescribed therapeutic activity fun, but it makes for great bonding time between Atticus and his father, Jared.(WATCH the video above)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreAlmost half the center of Paris will be accessible only by foot or bicycle this Sunday to mark World Car-Free Day.In response to rising air pollution that made Paris the most polluted city in the world for a brief time, Mayor Anne Hidalgo promoted the first World Car-Free Day last year.Hidalgo also has supported a “Paris Breathes” day that clears traffic from eight lanes of the Champs-Élysées once a month. About 400 miles of streets will be closed to cars, which is expected to bring significant reduction in nitrogen dioxide levels.LOOK: World’s Most Eco-Friendly Country Hails Newborn Prince in a Perfect WayLast year’s car-free day showed a 40 percent drop in nitrogen dioxide levels in some parts of the city, according to an independent air pollution monitor, reports The Guardian –and sound levels dropped by 50 percent in the city’s center.Reprinted with permission from E&E PublishingSpread The Word: Click To Share – Photo by Hernán Piñera, CC   Look Closely to This Picture. when We Saw It, It Gave Us the Creeps.. Tips and Tricks x Sponsored by RevcontentFind Out More >87,478AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

first_imgStudents received more for their money this school year when the Office of Information Technology (OIT) increased the print quota. The undergraduate quota rose from 1,000 sheets per year to 1,500 sheets per year, said Brian Burchett, manager of technology enhanced learning spaces for OIT. For several years, the cost of printing one black and white sheet was 10 cents, Burchett said. “We dropped the price to five cents a sheet [for black and white], so students’ print quota went up by 50 percent,” he said. “And if they run out of print quota and they have to purchase more, now t0he price for students is half what it used to be.” The cost of printing one color sheet also decreased from 75 cents to 50 cents. However, Students have an initial quota of $75 per school year instead of the $100 given in past years, according to OIT’s website. Faculty members can no longer request increases in their students’ print quotas, Burchett said. “We basically made it unnecessary for them to have to do that,” Burchett said. “Last year and in previous years, we ended up doing hundreds of requests for thousands of students. It just seemed to us and the faculty with whom we consulted that it was easier to give all students the additional quota to start with, rather than wait.” OIT staff gathered feedback on the print system from the faculty members that requested increased quotas, Burchett said. The changes made this school year resulted from those conversations. “The overwhelming response we got from faculty was they would love it if they no longer had to make these requests,” Burchett said. “It was busy work, and since we could give students more quota automatically at the start of the year, that made a lot of sense to the faculty to do it that way.” Printing services are allocated in the OIT budget, Burchett said. OIT had to decrease other expenses in order to account for the increased printing costs. “I don’t know for sure where we made up the difference,” he said. “I don’t think that the increase in printing costs came from one specific area. I think it probably came from a number of different areas. We didn’t cut any of our services back.” Burchett said if students print double-sided, their print quotas are effectively stretched. “If a student prints a single sheet of paper and they have one impression, it will cost them five cents of print quota,” Burchett said. “If they print on it double-sided, that sheet of paper will still cost them five cents of print quota. So, in theory, if a student did all their printing double-sided, the student could print as many as 3,000 pages.” OIT has received very little feedback on the changes so far, but the feedback received was positive, Burchett said. “The faculty appreciate that they no longer have to generate a list and send it to us,” he said. “Some of the students had questions about the monetary value of the print quota, but it seems like the webpage, the posters and the email that was sent out answered a lot of those questions.” Burchett said he thought it was important for students to consider the printing service a public good. “If all students help conserve on the printing, it’s good for the University,” Burchett said. “We’d like to remind students if you don’t need to print something, please consider not printing.” Sophomore Marissa Bulso said she was pleased with the increased quota because her classes require a lot of printing. “All the same, my quota seems to be disappearing at an alarming rate,” Bulso said. “I’m already down to $65. I suppose it seems low because last year we started at $100. I still wish printing assigned reading didn’t impact my quota so much.” Sophomore Vincent Burns said he’s not sure how the increased quota will affect him. “I didn’t come close to running out of paper last year, but that was probably because one of my professors got the class’s quota increased,” Burns said “Honestly, it will not make much of a difference for me, since I generally leave stuff online.”last_img read more